Hamlet and Poetry Conference

September 12-14, 2011
ATRiuM, Cardiff

Shakespeare’s Hamlet and its innumerable rewrites and intertextual traces have been shaping literary and cultural production for centuries. This multidisciplinary conference, organised by Dr Márta Minier (University of Glamorgan) and Dr Ruth J. Owen (Cardiff University) brought together scholars of literature from Modern Languages, English, Drama, Translation Studies and Creative Writing to reflect on the rewrites and traces in poetry.

The conference focused on the interrelationships between Hamlet and poetry in terms of influence, allusion, intertextuality and transposition. Whilst Hamlet has made possible some great modern poems, the ramifications of Shakespeare’s play for poetry and poetics have been considerably less charted than the narrative and dramatic rewrites. This conference aimed to redress the balance by examining how, and to what ends, poetry has recourse to Hamlet, its fragments and its translations.

Professor Neil Corcoran (University of Liverpool), author of Shakespeare and the Modern Poet (CUP, 2010) delivered a keynote entitled “A Politics of Translation: Robert Lowell/Boris Pasternak; Czeslaw Milosz/Zbigniew Herbert; William Shakespeare/Ciaran Carson”.

Other speakers include:

  • Nick Roberts: “Re-enactment and redemption: Hamlet, nation and the poetry of Eugenio Montejo”
  • Karen Leeder: “Spectres of Hamlet in contemporary German poetry”
  • Rocio Sumillera: “The influence of Shakespeare’s Hamlet on 20th-century Spanish poetry”
  • Márta Minier: “The Curious Case of Hamlet and Pet?fi: Poems by Arany, Vas and Finta”
  • Anneli Mihkelev: “One poem, many intertexts: Paul-Eerik Rummo’s ‘The Songs of Hamlet’ in Estonian culture”
  • Cristina Paravano: “An Italian Hamlet: The case of Alda Merini”
  • Aleksei Semenenko: “Hamlet in Boris Pasternak’s oeuvre: Context and subtexts”
  • Maria Elisa Montironi: “The introspective sponger: Shakespeare’s Hamlet in Brecht’s Poetry”
  • Anna Fochi: “Through Hamlet, with Hamlet, against Hamlet: Giovanni Testori’s ‘translation’ of the ‘ultimate’ character”
  • Guilia Sandelewski: “Hamlet understood: Textual interactivity and the poet’s self-fashioning as translator”

The conference also featured a poetry reading by Elin ap Hywel and Philip Gross.

Dowload a copy of the conference programme here.